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Use these tools to help you through your recovery and to track your progress to better heart health.

Additional information about Cardiac Rehab is available by click this link AHA Cardiac Rehab

 

Cardiac Rehab


Healthy Chicken Noodle Soup

Fall is here, the temperatures are dropping and that means it is soup season. What better to snuggle up with on a chilly fall day than a hearty bowl of healthy homestyle chicken noodle soup.

Ingredients

Servings  6  Serving Size  2 cups

 
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 3 medium carrots (thinly sliced)
  • 2 medium ribs of celery, leaves discarded, thinly sliced
  • 1 small onion (diced)
  • 4 cups fat-free, low-sodium chicken broth
  • 1 1/2 pounds boneless, skinless chicken breasts, all visible fat discarded, cut into bite-size pieces.
  • 3 cups water
  • 3 tablespoons fresh Italian (flat-leaf) parsley, minced.
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme (crumbled)
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper ((coarsely ground preferred))
  • 6 ounces dried no-yolk noodles

Directions

  1. Heat the oil in the pressure cooker on sauté. Cook the carrots, celery, and onion for 3 minutes, or until the carrots and celery are tender and the onion is soft, stirring frequently. Stir in the broth, chicken, water, parsley, thyme, salt, and pepper.
  2. Secure the lid. Cook on high pressure for 12 minutes. Allow the pressure to release naturally for 10 minutes, then quickly release any remaining pressure. Remove the pressure cooker lid.
  3. Set the pressure cooker to sauté. Heat until the soup comes to a simmer. Stir in the noodles. Cook for 8 to 10 minutes, or until the noodles are tender, stirring frequently.

Nutrition Facts
Calories – 282
Total Fat – 5.0 g
Saturated Fat – 1.0 g
Trans Fat – 0.0 g
Polyunsaturated Fat – 0.5 g
Monounsaturated Fat – 2.0 g
Cholesterol – 73 mg
Sodium – 324 mg
Total Carbohydrate – 27 g
Dietary Fiber – 3 g
Sugars – 4 g
Protein – 30 g

Dietary Exchanges:

1 1/2 starch, 1 vegetable, 3 lean meat

Check out all the heart healthy recipes at American Heart Association Recipes


Preventing Another Stroke

Don’t let stroke strike twice.

One in four stroke survivors has another.

Here’s how to help keep it from being you. Up to 80% of second clot-related strokes may be preventable.*

When you’ve had a stroke or TIA (transient ischemic attack), it’s likely that you’re at risk for another. It is important to know the type of stroke you had and its underlying cause to build the best plan to prevent another. If you don’t know the type or cause of your stroke, talk to your doctor about whether more testing is needed.

The good news is you have the power to reduce that risk. Take steps to build healthy habits like eating right, taking your medicines as prescribed and being as physically active as you’re able. Every healthy choice brings you one step closer to preventing another stroke.

Download the Taking Steps to Prevent Another Stroke Infographic (PDF) to learn ways to reduce stroke risk factors and for support resources from the American Heart Association.

*All health/medical information on this website has been reviewed and approved by the American Heart Association, based on scientific research and American Heart Association guidelines. Use this link for more information on our content editorial process

Hate Exercise? 5 Tips That May Change Your Mind

Try these tips from the American Heart Association to add some physical activity to your life that you may end up liking.

Find your jam.

Instead of forcing yourself to do something you don’t enjoy, find ways to exercise that fit your personality. If you’re a social person, do something that engages you socially – take a group dance class, join a recreational sports team, or start a walking group with friends. Connecting with your peeps is a great way to stay motivated and avoid working out alone. If you’re more of a lone wolf, running or swimming might be a better fit. And if you’re not a morning person, you’re not likely to get up at the crack of dawn to make a boot camp class.

Give it time.

It can take a while for a new behavior to become a habit, so give yourself time to get into a regular routine. One way is to try to be active around the same time each day. Exercise can become addictive in a good way. Once it becomes a habit, you’ll notice when you aren’t doing it.

Build it in.

Build activity into your schedule and lifestyle so it doesn’t feel like a chore. There are many ways to fit exercise into your life, and it doesn’t mean you have to give up something else, like time with family and friends. Get active together as a family, you’ll all benefit. And if you just can’t imagine life without your daily phone chat with your BFF, take that call for a walk around the block.

Break it up.

It’s OK to fit in physical activity when you can. The American Heart Association recommends a total of at least 150 minutes of moderate activity a week, but if that sounds overwhelming, try adding two or three short activity sessions most days of the week. It all adds up! You could do a quick yoga routine when you wake up, take a brisk walk after lunch at work, and if you commute with public transportation, get off a stop earlier and walk the rest of the way home.

Keep going.

If you miss a day or a workout, don’t worry about it. Everybody struggles once in a while. Just make sure you hit it again the next day. And if what you’re doing just isn’t working for you, revisit this list. You may need to try a different activity or a different time of day. Don’t give up!

Click on the link below for more information on healthy living and fitness

AHA Healthy Living and Fitness


Eat Healthy on a Budget by Planning Ahead

Eating healthy – lots of fruits and veggies, lean protein, whole grains – doesn’t have to be more expensive. If you shop smart and plan ahead, you’ll be surprised at how much goodness you can haul without breaking the bank.

The reality is, many of those ready-made, super-fast, prepackaged foods actually cost MORE than homemade foods. And they tend to have more calories, saturated fat, sodium and added sugars.

So drop the excuses because scoring those nutrient-dense, fiber-rich foods your body needs is easier – and cheaper – than you think.

Planning ahead is key to success.

Preparing menus and grocery lists ahead of time can keep you from making impulse food choices, which often aren’t healthy. With a little planning, you can make the healthy choice the easy choice.

  • Plan out one or two weeks of healthy meals for breakfast, lunch and dinner. Take a few minutes over the weekend to go through your favorite healthy recipes and map out your meal plan. Update your go-to list as you come across new recipes, and don’t be afraid to try new things!
  • Use a grocery list or meal-planning app with a grocery list feature. This will help you quickly grab the ingredients you need for your healthy meal plan.
  • If your work week is crazy, cook over the weekend and store pre-portioned meals in the fridge or freezer. Now this is a real time and money saver! Just thaw and reheat for hassle-free lunches and dinners.
  • Cut up fruits and vegetables and keep them handy in the fridge, or pre-pack individual servings for when you’re on the go. You’ll have ready-made healthy snacks and meal ingredients at your fingertips.

Shop smart to save big.

  • Knowing how to navigate the grocery store can save time and money.
  • Keep an eye out for specials. Stock up on frozen and canned produce when it’s on sale.
  • Use coupons and join store rewards programs. You’ll be more aware of what’s on sale and able to work it into your meal planning.
  • Buy fresh fruits and vegetables in season. For example, blueberries cost less in spring and summer, when they’re in season. You’ll pay more in the fall and winter when they’re shipped from warmer climates.
  • Skip the ready-made foods and individually-packaged snacks. The convenience may be tempting but it’s usually healthier and cheaper to prepare these same foods at home. So aim your cart in another direction.
  • Buy local at a farmer’s market. The produce may be fresher because it wasn’t picked before ripening to travel on a truck long-distance to get to you. You’ll know where your food is coming from and help your local economy. You can save money by buying in bulk and splitting the cost with friends or family.

Practices makes perfect.

  • Don’t give up! Putting a new healthy routine in place doesn’t happen overnight, so don’t give up!
  • Make healthy changes one step at a time. You and your family won’t feel blindsided or deprived of all of your favorites if the changes are gradual.
  • Involve the whole family. Kids can help with meal planning, grocery shopping and even cooking. Let each family member be chef for a day and take charge of a particular meal. Encourage older kids to make a game of reading food labels at the grocery store. Let younger kids pick out new types of fruits and vegetables to try. Get more budget-friendly tips online. The AHA has got your back in the grocery store and the kitchen. 

Learn more about healthy eating from the the American Heart Association link below.

Healthy Living – Healthy Eating


Life’s Simple 7

Life’s Simple 7 is defined by the American Heart Association as the 7 risk factors that people can improve through lifestyle changes to help achieve ideal cardiovascular heath.

  1. Manage Blood Pressure
  2. Control Cholesterol
  3. Reduce Blood Sugar
  4. Get Active
  5. Eat Better
  6. Lose Weight
  7. Stop Smoking

Over the next few months we will share more details on how to help you achieve these 7 lifestyle changes. Watch for information here on our website in our news articles under News & Information and on Facebook with a link to our blog. We are committed to keeping you heart healthy!


Boomers & Seniors Resource Directory 2019

Your resource for Health, Home, Fun & Living a Great Life!!

Senior Resource Directory 2019


Your heart-healthy recipes will taste even better with seasonal produce

Seasons of Eating

Your heart healthy recipes will taste even better with seasonal produce


Women and Heart Disease

The term heart disease refers to several types of heart conditions, including coronary artery disease and heart attack.

Although heart disease is sometimes thought of as a man’s disease, almost as many women as men die each year of heart disease in the United States.

This map shows death rates from heart disease in women in the United States. The darker red indicates a higher death rate.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How does heart disease affect women?

Despite increases in awareness over the past decades, only about half (56%) of women recognize that heart disease is their number 1 killer.1

Learn more facts about women and heart disease:

  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women in the United States, killing 299,578 women in 2017—or about 1 in every 5 female deaths.2
  • Heart disease is the leading cause of death for African American and white women in the United States. Among American Indian and Alaska Native women, heart disease and cancer cause roughly the same number of deaths each year. For Hispanic and Asian or Pacific Islander women, heart disease is second only to cancer as a cause of death.3
  • About 1 in 16 women age 20 and older (6.2%) have coronary heart disease, the most common type of heart disease:4
    • About 1 in 16 white women (6.1%), black women (6.5%), and Hispanic women (6%)
    • About 1 in 30 Asian women (3.2%)

What are the symptoms of heart disease?

Although some women have no symptoms, others may have5

  • Angina (dull and heavy or sharp chest pain or discomfort)
  • Pain in the neck, jaw, or throat
  • Pain in the upper abdomen or back

These symptoms may happen when you are resting or when you are doing regular daily activities. Women also may have other symptoms, including5

  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Fatigue

Sometimes heart disease may be “silent” and not diagnosed until you have other symptoms or emergencies, including5

  • Heart attack: Chest pain or discomfort, upper back or neck pain, indigestion, heartburn, nausea or vomiting, extreme fatigue, upper body discomfort, dizziness, and shortness of breath
  • Arrhythmia: Fluttering feelings in the chest (palpitations)
  • Heart failure: Shortness of breath, fatigue, or swelling of the feet, ankles, legs, abdomen, or neck veins

If you have any of these symptoms, call 9-1-1 right away.

What are the risk factors for heart disease?

High blood pressure, high LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, and smoking are key risk factors for heart disease. About half of all people in the United States (47%) have at least one of these three risk factors.6

Several other medical conditions and lifestyle choices can also put people at a higher risk for heart disease, including

  • Diabetes
  • Having overweight or obesity
  • Eating an unhealthy diet
  • Physical inactivity
  • Drinking too much alcohol

How can I reduce my risk of heart disease?

To lower your chances of getting heart disease, it’s important to do the following:7

  • Know your blood pressure. Having uncontrolled blood pressure can lead to heart disease. High blood pressure has no symptoms, so it’s important to have your blood pressure checked regularly. Learn more about high blood pressure.
  • Talk to your doctor or health care team about whether you should be tested for diabetes. Having uncontrolled diabetes raises your risk of heart disease.8 Learn more about diabetes.
  • Quit smoking. If you don’t smoke, don’t start. If you do smoke, learn ways to quit.
  • Discuss checking your blood cholesterol and triglycerides with your doctor. Learn more about cholesterol.
  • Make healthy food choicesexternal icon. Having overweight or obesity raises your risk of heart disease. Learn more about overweight and obesity.
  • Limit how much alcohol you drink to one drink a day. Learn more about alcohol.
  • Manage stress levels by finding healthy ways to cope with stress. Learn more about coping with stress.

More Information

CDC’s Public Health Efforts Related to Heart Disease

For more information on women and heart disease, visit the following websites:

Source: cdc.gov


5 tasty ways to tweak recipes for healthier eating

By Mayo Clinic Staff

Want to cook healthier? These 5 tips will help you slice and dice recipes to cut fats and sugars, but pump up flavors.

Most of us have gotten the message: Upping our quota of fruits and veggies, and lowering our intake of salt, sugar, processed foods and red meat is a good idea. But if you’re struggling to master the art of cooking for wellness, you’re definitely not alone.

Nutrition pros have developed many techniques and tricks that can help you modify recipes for healthier eating — and evidence-based research tells us they taste great, too.

These five tips will help you get started.

1. Start fresh, stay positive
Nutrition experts often recommend starting with some new-to-you recipes to launch your healthier eating journey. But you’ll soon be savvy enough to transform favorite recipes into healthier versions, too.

Remember: “Healthier” doesn’t mean “less tasty.” Keep your mind open to experiencing new flavors. Enjoy the process as you experiment with fresh ingredients and create dishes that don’t rely on fat and salt for taste.

2. Reduce fats, sugars and salt, increase herbs and spices
Most of us consume too much saturated fat. But fat adds flavor, so scaling back fat alone is not the answer. Studies have found, though, if you scale back fat and pump up flavor by adding herbs and spices, you can get the great taste you crave.

For instance, instead of 80 percent lean meat, choose 95 percent lean meat. Then, use a heavier hand with the basil, oregano, garlic and other favorite flavors for a really satisfying result.

Researchers have tried the approach with dessert, too. In one study, they cut the sugar content of apple crisp by more than a third, but added an extra jolt of Saigon cinnamon to compensate. It worked: Tasters liked that version just as much as the full-sugar original.

Build up your store of herbs and spices, set the salt aside and you’ve got a solid formula for healthier, tastier eating.

3. Swap this for that
Learn some basic ingredient swaps and you’ll instantly up your healthy cooking quotient. Here are just a few examples:

Heavy cream or half-and-half = fat-free half-and-half
1 egg = 2 egg whites
Garlic salt = garlic powder
Syrup = pureed fruit
Ground beef = extra-lean beef, or ground chicken or ground turkey
White rice = wild rice, pearl barley or bulgur wheat

4. Learn new cooking techniques
Beware the fryer! Eating a lot of fried food has been associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, obesity and heart disease. Instead, learn to bake, grill, steam and roast.
Pre-heat your saute pan. Adding cold ingredients to a cold pan results in drier, less tasty food; starting with a hot pan lets you sear in flavor.

5. Stock the right tools
Nonstick pan. Does your recipe call for sauteing vegetables in oil? Using a good nonstick pan, you can usually saute without added fat.
Steamer basket. Many top chefs steam fish, chicken or seafood atop a layer of aromatic herbs or vegetables for moist, flavorful results without adding fat.
Kitchen shears. Invaluable for snipping away fat from meat, cutting up dried fruit for sauces and toppings, or quickly clipping fresh herbs.
Armed with your new knowledge and a few essential techniques and tools, you’ll be able to tackle any recipe, and make it your way — the healthy, delicious way.

Source: Mayo Clinic


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