Archives

How Much Do You Know About Heart Health Answers

Question #1

Answer: D. The latest statistics suggest that nearly 900,000 Americans die from heart disease each year—that’s 36% of all deaths. Cancer claims about 550,000 lives; accidents are responsible for 108,694 deaths; and HIV/AIDS kills about 13,000 Americans annually.

Question #2

Answer: E. All the foods listed above contain considerable amounts of sodium. In fact, some cereals have more sodium than potato chips. Even if you don’t add a single dash of salt to food, you could be getting too much sodium. Most of us take in more sodium through convenience foods than by using table salt.

Questions #3

Answer: E. Each is considered “a drink.” Men should only have up to two alcoholic drinks per day; women should stick to one drink.

Question #4

Answer: E. None of the above. There is not sufficient science to justify taking antioxidant (or other types of nutritional) supplements to prevent heart disease.

Question #5

Answer: E. All of the above. As with men, a woman’s most common heart attack symptom is chest pain. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience other common symptoms (some of which mimic a bad case of indigestion). Experiencing chest discomfort, particularly with one or more of the other signs listed above, for more than five minutes warrants seeking medical attention.


How Much Do You Know About Heart Health? Take The Quiz!

Quiz yourself on your knowledge of heart health!

1. How many Americans die from heart disease each year?

A) 20,000
B) 75,000
C) 350,000
D) 900,000

2. As salt intake increases, so does your blood pressure. Which food is high in sodium?

A) Potato chips
B) Cereal
C) Cookies
D) Cheese
E) All of the above

3. Studies show that moderate alcohol intake is associated with reduced risk of cardiovascular disease. Which is considered a “drink”?

A) A 12-ounce bottle of beer
B) A 4-ounce glass of wine
C) 1½-ounce shot of 80-proof vodka
D) 1 ounce of 100-proof alcohol
E) All of the above

4. Which of the following supplements should you take to reduce your risk of heart disease?

A) Selenium
B) Vitamin E
C) Vitamins B6 and B12
D) Vitamin C
E) None of the above

5. Which symptoms of a heart attack are most common to women?

A) Chest pain or discomfort
B) Shortness of breath
C) Nausea/vomiting
D) Back or jaw pain
E) All of the above
 

Check Your Answers Here!

 

30 Minute Workout Fix the Winter Blues

 

There are going to be days when you just don’t want to go to the gym. It might be raining, snowing or it might just be darn right cold. There are a lot of exercises that you can do at home to get an efficient and challenging workout on those days.

Here is a quick routine that targets your entire body in approximately 30 minutes without using weights or bulky machines.

 

Warm Up: Quadriplex or Opposite Arm and Leg

You need to be on all fours and raise your right arm and left leg at the same time and then do the same with the other side. I want you to do three sets in a row. Do 20 reps per side (non-stop, no rest). This will take approximately four minutes.

Abdominal Crunches Followed by Plank

Do three sets of 30 proper crunches and then immediately go into a full plank and hold that position for 60 seconds. Do this back to back with only 20 second rests between each set. This will take approximately five minutes.

Mounain Climbers

Now do mountain climbers in a standing position. Get your knees as high and as fast as possible for 60 seconds. Do this two times in a row with only 30 seconds rest between each set. This will take approximately three minutes.

Push Ups and Full-Body Plank, ISO Hold

Do a pushup either on your toes or knees for three sets of 15 to 20 repetitions. On your last repetition, hold a full-body plank with a slight bend in your elbows for 60 seconds. Rest 20 seconds between each set. This will take approximately six minutes.

Standing Stationary Lunge Squat With Three-Second Hold Squats

Do a simple standing-in-place lunge with foot placement in front and back (proper positioning). Do three sets per side for 20 reps each. Immediately after this exercise, go into a regular squat. Every time you go down (eccentric phase), hold for three seconds and then come up (concentric phase). This will take approximately five minutes.

Supermans with Arms Straight Out

Do an Isometric Superman (arms and legs elevated with chest barely off the ground) and hold that position on your stomach for 30 seconds. Right after the 30 seconds, pretend that you are swimming, and do this movement for 60 seconds. Do three sets of this with a 20-second rest between each set. This will take approximately six minutes.

Rest. Cool down. You are done!

article from active.com

 


Top 4 Worst Foods For Your Heart

Heart disease is the leading cause of death among Americans: on average, one person dies every 39 seconds, according to recently published data from the American Heart Association. Along with healthy lifestyle choices, what you eat can have a big effect on your heart health. Here are 4 of the worst foods to eat for your heart, and the best to eat too.

—Brierley Wright, M.S., R.D., Nutrition Editor, EatingWell Magazine

 

Trans Fat

One of the easiest to limit (or avoid) in your diet—and it’s quite harmful to your heart health—trans fat. Why are trans fats so harmful? Like saturated fat, trans fat raises your “bad” LDL cholesterol, possibly even more than saturated fats, according to research. Trans fat also lowers your “good” HDL cholesterol. The American Heart Association recommends limiting the amount of trans fat you eat daily to less than 1 percent of your total calories. If you eat 2,000 calories a day, that translates to about 2 (or fewer) grams.

How can you limit, or eliminate trans fat from your diet? The easiest way to avoid trans fat is by skipping foods that contain “hydrogenated oil” or “partially hydrogenated oil” in their ingredient lists. Big culprits include packaged snacks, crackers, bakery goods and some margarines. Read labels carefully: if a package claims “zero trans fat,” the amount per serving may be less than 0.5 g and could have been rounded down to zero, so the only way to be sure you’re getting a product without trans fat is to read ingredient lists.

Trans fats are also found naturally—albeit in small amounts—in animal products, such as beef, pork, lamb and the butterfat in butter and milk. Limiting how much beef, pork, lamb and butter you eat and swapping full-fat dairy products, like milk and cheese, for low- or nonfat versions will help too.

 

Saturated Fat

Butter. Sour cream. Mayo. These foods—as well as fatty cuts of meats—are high in the saturated fats that elevate “bad” LDL cholesterol, leading to plaque buildup in arteries. Limit saturated fats to 5 percent or less of your total calories (divide your weight by 12 to get the daily total limit in grams). For example, try replacing butter with vegetable-based oils, particularly olive and canola oil, both of which contain good amounts of heart-healthy monounsaturated fats, and by swapping in lean poultry, fish and beans for higher-fat meats.

 

Salt

Americans on average take in 3,400 milligrams of sodium each day. That’s a third more than the daily recommended limit of 2,300 mg (about 1 teaspoon salt) and more than double the 1,500 mg suggestion for adults age 51 and older and for anyone who is salt-sensitive (e.g., people who are African-American, those with high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease)—about half the U.S. population. Cutting your sodium intake can help lower high blood pressure and also reduce your risk of developing high blood pressure.

One of the easiest ways to cut back on your salt intake is to not add it if you can’t taste it. In other words, don’t add salt to boiling water for pasta or potatoes, but add it to a dish when its impact will be strongest—usually at the end of cooking. A little salt goes a longer way if it’s sprinkled on a food just before serving; you’ll taste it in every bite.

Another way to slash your sodium intake is to replace sodium-laden processed foods with fresh foods. Other tricks: look for “low sodium” or “no-salt-added” labels and rinse canned beans.

 

Added Sugars

Let’s face it: Americans eat too much sugar. We consume 355 calories—or 22 teaspoons—of added sugars a day, says a recent study. Added sugars are those added to food by consumers or manufacturers. “Reducing added sugars will reduce cardiovascular disease risk,” says Rachel Johnson, Ph.D., R.D., chair of the American Heart Association (AHA) writing group for the AHA scientific statement on sugars and cardiovascular disease and EatingWellnutrition advisor. “High intakes of added sugars are linked with increased risks for high blood pressure and high triglyceride levels, risk factors for heart disease.”

The AHA recommends that women limit their added sugars to no more than 100 calories per day, or about 6 teaspoons, and men should eat less than 150 calories, approximately 9 teaspoons. (A 12-ounce can of cola has about 8 teaspoons.)

These recommendations apply only to added sugars, which supply calories but no nutritional value, and not to sugars that occur naturally in healthful foods (fructose in fruit, lactose in dairy). It’s fairly easy to keep track of sugars you add yourself. Added sugars in processed foods are more difficult to track. “Sugars” on Nutrition Facts panels include natural and added sugars. Check the ingredient list for sugar and all its aliases: corn sweetener or syrup, honey, molasses, fruit juice concentrate, high-fructose corn syrup, invert sugar, malt sugar and syrup and sugar molecules ending in “ose” (dextrose, fructose, glucose, lactose, maltose, sucrose). In general, the closer sugars are to the top of the list, the more the food contains.

Article from EatingWell.com


© 2018 Alpine Cardiology, All Rights Reserved